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Updated: 2 years 16 weeks ago

Jim Dwyer, Executive Director of BCM, Interview for Coal Mongolia-2012

Thu, 2012-01-26 12:47
Source:  www.mining.mn  - First of all, thank you for supporting the forum. Last year you also collaborated in this area. How do you assess the importance of the upcoming “Coal Mongolia-2012”? Last year coal became the number one Mongolian export and quite properly a priority subject at “Coal Mongolia-2011” regarding economic growth.  The GoM and the private sector mutually need to understand the current situation, trends and goals for socially responsible project missions for the sector’s development.  BCM supported the event last year and was pleased to see the conference hall filled and many productive discussions held on related topics.  I believe this year at “Coal Mongolia-2012” we will again have a huge turnout.  Participation by attendees with an outcome where recommendations will be shared with appropriate GoM officials for implementation for economic growth would be of vital importance. - Coal export has increased significantly over the last few years. Investment into this field has expanded and there are many other companies that are willing to invest. How do you see the current trend of the coal sector development? Coal exports will continue to ramp up dramatically if the infrastructure constraints are resolved.  Foreign investment has doubled over 2010 and will also continue at a rapid pace.  Just this week Trifigura, the Amsterdam-based commodities giant, announced it is in the Mongolian market for coal assets.  The Government needs to promote environmentally safe modern technologies.  Environmental regulations should be enacted with proper enforcement.  Limitations should be imposed on unsafe operators.  - Coal is now playing a key role in Mongolia’s economic growth. It is now certain that coal export will go beyond 40 mln tones in the near future. While it is good to have growth in export, there are many difficulties including infrastructure and border transmission capacity. So, how do assess the speed of the Government in resolving these barriers which have emerged following the export growth?
Infrastructure needs are dramatic with implementation very slow.  Only 4% of Mongolia’s roads are paved.  Companies such as Energy Resources and MoEnCo have recently built major paved roads, but progress by the Government, for example on the East-West Highway, has been minimal so far.  MoEnCo finally, after more than a year’s wait, received the necessary approvals from 5 soums along its new 300-plus km road, but now its coal shipments are blocked at the border. The continued buildup of coal shipments from 5 major producers in the Gobi is endangered because rail to the south border has not yet begun for political reasons.  Given the 2-3 year time frame needed for such rail construction, this could very likely curtail forecasted growth of exports. The Government must resolve and mitigate such barriers to economic growth. - What do you think about the investment environment of the coal sector? Mongolia is pursuing a strategy to process coal and to produce more value added products in order to increase the price of its minerals. In this respect, what in environment has to be changed to attract and motivate investors?
Progress is definitely being made to produce more value-added products.  Energy Resources spent approximately USD 200 million to construct Mongolia’s first coal washing facility.  MAK has just contracted for a USD 105 million copper concentrator. Investors are motivated and attracted by a sustainable, transparent legislative atmosphere.  Investors need clarity and consistency, without “rediscussions”.  Then, when investors evaluate possible investments, “country risk” will be minimized and positive investment decisions made. - What is the most significant result that you expect from “Coal Mongolia-2012”? What are your expectations in terms of issues to be discussed and brought to the decision making level? It would be wonderful if a set of recommendations based on the key issues raised by Mongolian-based companies at “Coal Mongolia-2012” would be presented to and acted upon by appropriate Government officials for decision-making resolutions beneficial to all stakeholders in Mongolia. Reporter: G. Bat 
Categories: News

Jim Dwyer, Executive Director of BCM, Interview for Coal Mongolia-2012

Thu, 2012-01-26 12:47
Source:  www.mining.mn  - First of all, thank you for supporting the forum. Last year you also collaborated in this area. How do you assess the importance of the upcoming “Coal Mongolia-2012”? Last year coal became the number one Mongolian export and quite properly a priority subject at “Coal Mongolia-2011” regarding economic growth.  The GoM and the private sector mutually need to understand the current situation, trends and goals for socially responsible project missions for the sector’s development.  BCM supported the event last year and was pleased to see the conference hall filled and many productive discussions held on related topics.  I believe this year at “Coal Mongolia-2012” we will again have a huge turnout.  Participation by attendees with an outcome where recommendations will be shared with appropriate GoM officials for implementation for economic growth would be of vital importance. - Coal export has increased significantly over the last few years. Investment into this field has expanded and there are many other companies that are willing to invest. How do you see the current trend of the coal sector development? Coal exports will continue to ramp up dramatically if the infrastructure constraints are resolved.  Foreign investment has doubled over 2010 and will also continue at a rapid pace.  Just this week Trifigura, the Amsterdam-based commodities giant, announced it is in the Mongolian market for coal assets.  The Government needs to promote environmentally safe modern technologies.  Environmental regulations should be enacted with proper enforcement.  Limitations should be imposed on unsafe operators.  - Coal is now playing a key role in Mongolia’s economic growth. It is now certain that coal export will go beyond 40 mln tones in the near future. While it is good to have growth in export, there are many difficulties including infrastructure and border transmission capacity. So, how do assess the speed of the Government in resolving these barriers which have emerged following the export growth?
Infrastructure needs are dramatic with implementation very slow.  Only 4% of Mongolia’s roads are paved.  Companies such as Energy Resources and MoEnCo have recently built major paved roads, but progress by the Government, for example on the East-West Highway, has been minimal so far.  MoEnCo finally, after more than a year’s wait, received the necessary approvals from 5 soums along its new 300-plus km road, but now its coal shipments are blocked at the border. The continued buildup of coal shipments from 5 major producers in the Gobi is endangered because rail to the south border has not yet begun for political reasons.  Given the 2-3 year time frame needed for such rail construction, this could very likely curtail forecasted growth of exports. The Government must resolve and mitigate such barriers to economic growth. - What do you think about the investment environment of the coal sector? Mongolia is pursuing a strategy to process coal and to produce more value added products in order to increase the price of its minerals. In this respect, what in environment has to be changed to attract and motivate investors?
Progress is definitely being made to produce more value-added products.  Energy Resources spent approximately USD 200 million to construct Mongolia’s first coal washing facility.  MAK has just contracted for a USD 105 million copper concentrator. Investors are motivated and attracted by a sustainable, transparent legislative atmosphere.  Investors need clarity and consistency, without “rediscussions”.  Then, when investors evaluate possible investments, “country risk” will be minimized and positive investment decisions made. - What is the most significant result that you expect from “Coal Mongolia-2012”? What are your expectations in terms of issues to be discussed and brought to the decision making level? It would be wonderful if a set of recommendations based on the key issues raised by Mongolian-based companies at “Coal Mongolia-2012” would be presented to and acted upon by appropriate Government officials for decision-making resolutions beneficial to all stakeholders in Mongolia. Reporter: G. Bat 
Categories: News

Jim Dwyer, Executive Director of BCM, Interview for Coal Mongolia-2012

Thu, 2012-01-26 12:47
Source:  www.mining.mn  - First of all, thank you for supporting the forum. Last year you also collaborated in this area. How do you assess the importance of the upcoming “Coal Mongolia-2012”? Last year coal became the number one Mongolian export and quite properly a priority subject at “Coal Mongolia-2011” regarding economic growth.  The GoM and the private sector mutually need to understand the current situation, trends and goals for socially responsible project missions for the sector’s development.  BCM supported the event last year and was pleased to see the conference hall filled and many productive discussions held on related topics.  I believe this year at “Coal Mongolia-2012” we will again have a huge turnout.  Participation by attendees with an outcome where recommendations will be shared with appropriate GoM officials for implementation for economic growth would be of vital importance. - Coal export has increased significantly over the last few years. Investment into this field has expanded and there are many other companies that are willing to invest. How do you see the current trend of the coal sector development? Coal exports will continue to ramp up dramatically if the infrastructure constraints are resolved.  Foreign investment has doubled over 2010 and will also continue at a rapid pace.  Just this week Trifigura, the Amsterdam-based commodities giant, announced it is in the Mongolian market for coal assets.  The Government needs to promote environmentally safe modern technologies.  Environmental regulations should be enacted with proper enforcement.  Limitations should be imposed on unsafe operators.  - Coal is now playing a key role in Mongolia’s economic growth. It is now certain that coal export will go beyond 40 mln tones in the near future. While it is good to have growth in export, there are many difficulties including infrastructure and border transmission capacity. So, how do assess the speed of the Government in resolving these barriers which have emerged following the export growth?
Infrastructure needs are dramatic with implementation very slow.  Only 4% of Mongolia’s roads are paved.  Companies such as Energy Resources and MoEnCo have recently built major paved roads, but progress by the Government, for example on the East-West Highway, has been minimal so far.  MoEnCo finally, after more than a year’s wait, received the necessary approvals from 5 soums along its new 300-plus km road, but now its coal shipments are blocked at the border. The continued buildup of coal shipments from 5 major producers in the Gobi is endangered because rail to the south border has not yet begun for political reasons.  Given the 2-3 year time frame needed for such rail construction, this could very likely curtail forecasted growth of exports. The Government must resolve and mitigate such barriers to economic growth. - What do you think about the investment environment of the coal sector? Mongolia is pursuing a strategy to process coal and to produce more value added products in order to increase the price of its minerals. In this respect, what in environment has to be changed to attract and motivate investors?
Progress is definitely being made to produce more value-added products.  Energy Resources spent approximately USD 200 million to construct Mongolia’s first coal washing facility.  MAK has just contracted for a USD 105 million copper concentrator. Investors are motivated and attracted by a sustainable, transparent legislative atmosphere.  Investors need clarity and consistency, without “rediscussions”.  Then, when investors evaluate possible investments, “country risk” will be minimized and positive investment decisions made. - What is the most significant result that you expect from “Coal Mongolia-2012”? What are your expectations in terms of issues to be discussed and brought to the decision making level? It would be wonderful if a set of recommendations based on the key issues raised by Mongolian-based companies at “Coal Mongolia-2012” would be presented to and acted upon by appropriate Government officials for decision-making resolutions beneficial to all stakeholders in Mongolia. Reporter: G. Bat 
Categories: News

Jim Dwyer, Executive Director of BCM, Interview for Coal Mongolia-2012

Thu, 2012-01-26 12:47
Source:  www.mining.mn  - First of all, thank you for supporting the forum. Last year you also collaborated in this area. How do you assess the importance of the upcoming “Coal Mongolia-2012”? Last year coal became the number one Mongolian export and quite properly a priority subject at “Coal Mongolia-2011” regarding economic growth.  The GoM and the private sector mutually need to understand the current situation, trends and goals for socially responsible project missions for the sector’s development.  BCM supported the event last year and was pleased to see the conference hall filled and many productive discussions held on related topics.  I believe this year at “Coal Mongolia-2012” we will again have a huge turnout.  Participation by attendees with an outcome where recommendations will be shared with appropriate GoM officials for implementation for economic growth would be of vital importance. - Coal export has increased significantly over the last few years. Investment into this field has expanded and there are many other companies that are willing to invest. How do you see the current trend of the coal sector development? Coal exports will continue to ramp up dramatically if the infrastructure constraints are resolved.  Foreign investment has doubled over 2010 and will also continue at a rapid pace.  Just this week Trifigura, the Amsterdam-based commodities giant, announced it is in the Mongolian market for coal assets.  The Government needs to promote environmentally safe modern technologies.  Environmental regulations should be enacted with proper enforcement.  Limitations should be imposed on unsafe operators.  - Coal is now playing a key role in Mongolia’s economic growth. It is now certain that coal export will go beyond 40 mln tones in the near future. While it is good to have growth in export, there are many difficulties including infrastructure and border transmission capacity. So, how do assess the speed of the Government in resolving these barriers which have emerged following the export growth?
Infrastructure needs are dramatic with implementation very slow.  Only 4% of Mongolia’s roads are paved.  Companies such as Energy Resources and MoEnCo have recently built major paved roads, but progress by the Government, for example on the East-West Highway, has been minimal so far.  MoEnCo finally, after more than a year’s wait, received the necessary approvals from 5 soums along its new 300-plus km road, but now its coal shipments are blocked at the border. The continued buildup of coal shipments from 5 major producers in the Gobi is endangered because rail to the south border has not yet begun for political reasons.  Given the 2-3 year time frame needed for such rail construction, this could very likely curtail forecasted growth of exports. The Government must resolve and mitigate such barriers to economic growth. - What do you think about the investment environment of the coal sector? Mongolia is pursuing a strategy to process coal and to produce more value added products in order to increase the price of its minerals. In this respect, what in environment has to be changed to attract and motivate investors?
Progress is definitely being made to produce more value-added products.  Energy Resources spent approximately USD 200 million to construct Mongolia’s first coal washing facility.  MAK has just contracted for a USD 105 million copper concentrator. Investors are motivated and attracted by a sustainable, transparent legislative atmosphere.  Investors need clarity and consistency, without “rediscussions”.  Then, when investors evaluate possible investments, “country risk” will be minimized and positive investment decisions made. - What is the most significant result that you expect from “Coal Mongolia-2012”? What are your expectations in terms of issues to be discussed and brought to the decision making level? It would be wonderful if a set of recommendations based on the key issues raised by Mongolian-based companies at “Coal Mongolia-2012” would be presented to and acted upon by appropriate Government officials for decision-making resolutions beneficial to all stakeholders in Mongolia. Reporter: G. Bat 
Categories: News

BCM supports passing of the Draft Securities Law in this Parliament Session

Wed, 2012-01-11 00:00
We are forwarding the attached Open Letter with Mongolian translation (non-official) from Mr. Bill Gorman who has completed his assignment at the MSE for the London Stock Exchange. BCM strongly supports the passing of the draft Securities Law in this session of Parliament.  The MSE's development urgently requires this legislation on a timely basis. Dear Ministers, Government officials and others interested in the Mongolian Securities Market's modernization, As I depart Mongolia, I feel duty bound to state that I strongly believe that successful and timely privatization of Erdenes Tavan Tolgoi (ETT) is dependent upon a proper Securities Markets law being promulgated by the current Parliament. My rationale is noted below. I have taken the liberty of copying those parties who have expressed interest in the draft law.

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Categories: News