Home arrow News Archives arrow Culture & Arts

 
Mongolia 's Latest News & Current Events, Directly from Ulaanbaatar

Login

Latest comments

Mongolia seeks $3 bi...
But I do appreciate and see the angles of Roy's postings to ...
More...
By INTJay

Mongolia seeks $3 bi...
If the Mongolian government can easily raise capital from in...
More...
By Threefold Minority

Mongolia seeks $3 bi...
Thanks for the response. Would like to hear from more on thi...
More...
By INTJay

Now Online...

Culture & Arts
Mongolian teacher of Buddhism receives Prince Claus Award PDF Print E-mail
Tuesday, 09 December 2008
purevbat with monks skulls.jpg
The Netherlands-based Prince Claus Award has been presented to a Mongolian teacher of Buddhism. 
G.Purevbat, born in Tov Aimag, has been presented the award for his work as an artist and teacher of the Vajrayana Buddhist tradition.  

Purevbat has worked to revitalize Buddhism in Mongolia, which was suppressed under the communist regime. Purevbat founded a school to train artists and teachers in disciplines such as painting, sculpting, appliqué, architecture and dance. He established the Zanabazar Mongolian Institute of Buddhist Art, which sponsors exhibitions, documents historical sites and undertakes restoration projects and the re-introduction of festivals.  

lama purevbat with a four horns goat on research work about abnormal figures of animalsHe also was recognized for creating a masters course for graduates and his ongoing writing of a 23-volume series on Buddhist art theories and techniques.  
The Prince Claus Awards noted, in announcing the award, “Purevbat’s fine artworks, inspirational activities and dissemination of knowledge have created a renaissance in Mongolian cultural identity and timely self-affirmation.  Artist and scholar, Venerable Purevbat is honored for the rigorous authenticity of his methods and techniques, for re-establishing an important ‘un-modern’ aesthetic practice, for his dedication and generosity in fostering future generations, and for nurturing local identity through artistic tradition and culture.” 

The annual Prince Claus Awards are presented to offer individuals and organizations “new opportunities and recognition,” according to the Prince Claus Fund.

Comments (1) | Quote this article on your site

 
Mongolia Events at Montana State University PDF Print E-mail
Tuesday, 18 November 2008

Nadaam: kids on horses

Montana State University Announces:

Mongolia, a visually stunning country that shares much with Montana but also contrasts with it in important ways, will be the focus of Montana State University's International Education Week 2008, set Nov. 17-21.

This is the sixth year that MSU's Office of International Programs has sponsored an international education week. The event emphasizes the culture and traditions of a country while offering to the community free admission to lectures, film, stories and demonstrations. Mongolia is a natural topic for international education week because it is linked to Montana in several ways, according to Norman Peterson, MSU's Vice Provost for International Education. 

"Mongolia shares similar landscapes and environmental challenges with Montana," Peterson said. "It is also a land of haunting beauty and singular customs that will be the topic of a great line-up of interesting, free events throughout the week. I hope everyone on campus and in the Bozeman community is able to attend."

Bolortsetseg Minjin, a paleontologist from Mongolia who is currently a visiting scholar at the Museum of the Rockies, will kick off the Discover Mongolia week with a presentation about dinosaurs in Mongolia. Her talk is set for noon, Monday, Nov. 17, in SUB room 275.

In 2007 Bolortsetseg founded the non-profit "Institute for the Study of Mongolian Dinosaurs" (ISMD) in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia. The goal of the organization is to build a museum in Mongolia to preserve dinosaurs and other national treasures, and to further science education in the country. Since 2005 she has worked with MSU's Jack Horner, who has supported her efforts to improve Mongolian paleontology. She is working on the paleobiology of the Cretaceous dinosaur Psittacosaurus while at the Museum of the Rockies on a post-doctoral research position.

Bozeman freelance photographer Gordon Wiltsie, whose work is frequently published in National Geographic and other national magazines, will narrate a slideshow, "Images of Mongolia" at 7 p.m. Monday, Nov. 17, in SUB Ballroom A. 

Be first to comment this article | Quote this article on your site

 
Historic Mongolian Movie in Cafe Amsterdam PDF Print E-mail
Tuesday, 11 November 2008

Tsogt Taij Historic Mongolian Film
The Historic Mongolian Film Tsogt Taij
Wednesday 8pm - ding dong -  Cafe Amsterdam brings you another cultural event!

Tonight in Cafe Amsterdam - A Historic Movie: the 1945 epic: "Tsogt Taij"

This film revolves around Choghtu Khong Tayiji, a 17th century Mongolian prince who waged a campaign against Tibetan forces. Much like Michael the Brave, the film depicts a mediaeval hero fighting against foreign invaders, with a nationalist vision, in this case the vision of a 'united and sovereign' Mongolia. Both in theme and stylistically, it also shares some characteristics with Alexander Nevsky, but it has a distinctive feeling which sets it apart from these films.

One of the main points of the film seems to be its message against Tibetan Buddhism. This was one of the primary belief systems against which anti-religious propaganda was directed in the early decades of Mongolian socialism. The figure of Choghtu Khong Tayiji was undoubtedly chosen for the film because of his fight against the Tibetans. Here, the Tibetan Lamas are portrayed as a cynical invading force, in which supposed pacifistic beliefs of Buddhists are easily cast aside when the occasion demands it. More importantly, Tibetan Buddhism is painted as the diametrical opposite of Mongolian nationalism, because to be patriotic is to resist the Buddhist invasion.


Tonight 20.00h in Cafe Amsterdam, just East of the State Department Store

More info:

Cafe Amsterdam


Be first to comment this article | Quote this article on your site

 
Mongolia's Giant Steppes Jazz Fesitval Kicks Off PDF Print E-mail
Tuesday, 30 September 2008

Giant Steppes International Jazz Festival

September 30 to October 4, 2008

 

 

Tuesday, September 30

Afternoon: Free public jazz workshop and performance hosted by Northern Lights

 

19:00    Harry's Pub, Sunjin Grand Hotel. Performers: Nils Petter Molvaer's Trio (Norway) and Anar's Trio (Mongolia). Ticket price: 10,000 MNT.

Wednesday, October 1 

Afternoon/evening: Free public jazz workshop and performance hosted by Northern Lights

 

22:00    Jazz Jam at the Grand Khaan Irish Pub with Northern Lights, Djabe and friends

 

Thursday, October 2 

Afternoon: Free public jazz workshop and performance hosted by Northern Lights

 

19:00    River Sounds. Performers: Djabe (Hungary) and Pause feat. Khulan (Mongolia). Ticket price: 10,000 MNT.

22:00    Jazz Jam at the Grand Khaan Irish Pub with Northern Lights, Djabe and friends

 

Friday, October 3

Afternoon: Free public jazz workshop and performance hosted by Northern Lights

 

19:00    Gala Concert, Khan Bank Theater. Mongolia performers plus Djabe (Hungary) and Northern Lights (Canada)  Ticket price: 15,000 MNT.

22:00    Jazz Jam at the Grand Khaan Irish Pub with Northern Lights, Djabe and friends

 

Saturday, October 4 

19:00    Khan Bank Theater. Performers: Northern Lights (Canada) in collaboration with Mongolian musicians in celebration of 35 years of Canada-Mongolia relations.  Ticket price: 10,000 MNT.
  

22:00    Jazz Jam at the Grand Khaan Irish Pub with Northern Lights, Djabe and friends

Be first to comment this article | Quote this article on your site

 
Eagle Festival honors Mongolian culture of trained hunting birds PDF Print E-mail
Wednesday, 24 September 2008

The annual Eagle Festival will be held in Mongolia’s far western Bayan-Ulgii province on October 4 and 5. 

The festival was traditionally meant to honor the first day of snow along with the eagles’ first day of hunting for the season. Eagles were trained to hunt for thousands of years in Central Asia. Today, however, trained eagles are only found in Mongolia. 

The festival includes a parade where hunters and their eagles are displayed in the central square. Also, competitions are held in which eagles catch small animals such as fox and hares. 

Performances are held during the festivals and prizes awarded for the fastest eagle, for the best traditional Kazakh dress, and more. 

Officials say some 200 tourists from 14 countries have come to Mongolia to attend the Eagle Festival.

Comments (2) | Quote this article on your site

 
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next > End >>

Results 1 - 9 of 146

Google Comment

Join us with your Google account....

General Discussion

Classifieds

Statistics

Members: 1263
News: 2204
WebLinks: 17
Visitors: 12004874

Google Translation

Translate This Website

Mongolia Websites

A site with information related to the environment and buddhism. There is a section on the Northern Buddhist Conference on Ecology and Development.
www.buddhistecology.org/