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Cold days in Mongolia PDF Print E-mail
Thursday, 02 February 2006
From the 1st of February 2005 Mongolia experienced its coldest days in the last year. The National Agency for Metereology, Hydrology and Environment Monitoring says that the cold period will last for 7 days. There is an extra sense of coldness caused by the wind chill brought from winds coming from Siberia. During the nights the temperature reaches  -41C, and during the days -24C can be measured.

Mongolia is high, cold, and dry. It has an extreme continental climate with long, cold winters and short summers, during which most precipitation falls. The country averages 257 cloudless days a year, and it is usually at the center of a region of high atmospheric pressure. Precipitation is highest in the north, which averages 20 to 35 centimeters per year, and lowest in the south, which receives 10 to 20 centimeters. The extreme south is the Gobi, some regions of which receive no precipitation at all in most years.

Average temperatures over most of the country are below freezing from November through March and are about freezing in April and October. January and February averages of -20° C are common, with winter nights of -40° C occurring most years. Summer extremes reach as high as 38° C in the southern Gobi region and 33° C in Ulaanbaatar.

 Ulaanbaatar lies at 1,351 meters above sea level in the valley of the Tuul Gol, a river. Located in the relatively well-watered north, it receives an annual average of 31 centimeters of precipitation, almost all of which falls in July and in August. Ulaanbaatar has an average annual temperature of -2.9°C and a frost-free period extending on the average from mid-June to late August.


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During the Stalinist purges of the 1930's almost every monastery in Mongolia was destroyed. In 1979 an atlas was published in Ulaanbaatar by Mr. Rinchen with an overview of more than 900 religious sites that used to exist in Mongolia. However a lot the information listed seems to be not accurate. A research has been initiated to get a better idea of all the buddhist buildings that once stood in Mongolia.